Masatoshi Suzuki, PhD, DVM

Portrait of Masatoshi Suzuki, PhD, DVM
Assistant Professor
Comparative Biosciences
Address: 
4124 Vet Med
2015 Linden Dr
Madison, WI 53706
Telephone: 
(608) 262-4264
Focus Groups: 
Neuroscience/Neuropathology
Education: 
DVM, Veterinary Medicine, The Ministry of Agriculture and Fishery, Japan
PhD, Veterinary Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan
Research Summary: 
Application of stem cells to developmental modeling and cell-based therapy
Research Detail: 

Our long-term objective is to apply stem cell technology to expand integrative sciences in both basic and translational research. The current research focuses on elucidating mechanisms of brain development in mammals using stem cells and finding possible applications of these cells for neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and muscular dystrophy.

On the translational front, we are using human neural progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic applications for ALS. The overall aim of our current idea is to provide neurotrophic growth factor delivery using stem cells to spinal cord (i.e. cell body) and and/or the skeletal muscle (i.e. nerve terminals of motor neurons) to establish whether this can protect motor neurons from degeneration in a rat model of ALS.

Furthermore, we start a new research project to establish skeletal muscle stem cells (or called myogenic progenitors) using human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This project is a part of the first project finding the best cells to transplant into the muscle for ALS and also will bring new therapeutic applications to other muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy.

Selected Publications: 
Krakora D, Mulcrone P, Meyer M, Lewis C, Bernau K, Gowing G, Zimprich C, Aebischer P, Svendsen CN, Suzuki M. Synergistic effects of GDNF and VEGF on lifespan and disease progression in a familial ALS rat model. Molecular Therapy, in press, 2013.
ichols NL, Gowing G, Satriotomo I, Nashold LJ, Dale EA, Suzuki M, Avalos P, Mulcrone PL, McHugh J, Svendsen CN, Mitchell GS. Intermittent hypoxia and stem cell implants preserve breathing capacity in a rodent model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Am J Respir Cirt Care Med 187: 535-542, 2013.
Hosoyama T, Meyer M, Krakora D, Suzuki M. Isolation and in vitro propagation of human skeletal muscle progenitor cells from fetal muscle. Cell Biology International, 37:191-6, 2013.
Li R, Strykowski R, Meyer M, Mulcrone P, Krakora D, Suzuki M. Male-specific differences in proliferation, neurogenesis, and sensitivity to oxidative stress in neural progenitor cells derived from a rat model of ALS. PLoS ONE, 7: e48581, 2012.
Hosoyama T, Van Dyke J, Suzuki M. Applications of skeletal muscle progenitor cells for neuromuscular diseases. American Journal of Stem Cells, 1: 253-263, 2012.
Krakora D, Macrander C, Suzuki M. Neuromuscular junction protection for the potential treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Neurology Research International, 379657, 2012.
Hayes-Punzo A, Mulcrone P, Meyer M, McHugh J, Svendsen CN, Suzuki M. Gonadectomy and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) do not modulate disease progression in the G93A mutant SOD1 rat model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, 13:311-14, 2012.
Masatoshi Suzuki, Sandra Klein, Elizabeth A. Wetzel, Michael Meyer, Jacalyn McHugh, Craig Tork, Antonio Hayes, Clive N. Svendsen. Acute glial activation by stab injuries does not lead to overt damage or motor neuron degeneration in the G93A mutant SOD1 rat model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Experimental Neurology, 211: 346-352, 2010.
Jonathan Riley, Thais Federici, John Park, Masatoshi Suzuki, Jacalyn McHugh, Craig Tork, Clin Franz, Qingshan Teng, Clive N. Svendsen, Nicholas Boulis. Cervical spinal cord therapeutic delivery: Preclinical safety validation of a stabilized microinjection platform.
Masatoshi Suzuki, Jacalyn McHugh, Craig Tork, Brandon Shelley, Antonio Hayes, Ilaria Bellantuono, Patrick Aebischer, Clive N. Svendsen. Direct muscle delivery of GDNF with human mesenchymal stem cells improves motor neuron survival and function in a rat model of familial ALS. Molecular Therapy, 16: 2002-2010, 2008.